SouthEast ENGLAND: SOUTHEAST

The most populous of the nine official regions of England, the boundaries of South East England include the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire, the Isle of Wight, Kent, Oxfordshire, and Surrey.

The population as of 2001 was recorded at 8,000,550 residents, which has the highest amount of residents in England outside of London.

The official usage of the term “South East” to describe this region refers to a varying area; it sometimes applies only to Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex and Surrey, but more often than not it can also mean the Standard Statistical region that includes the London commuter belt of the South East and East Anglia. 

One of the more prosperous towns of the South East is Reading in Berkshire County. Reading is not yet an officially recognised city (as of 2006), although it is an important commercial centre in Southern England that is often called the “Capital of the Thames Valley”. Reading is also home to headquarters for many important British corporations and UK offices for various foreign multinationals, including Microsoft, Oracle, Sage, Xansa and Yell.com.

Situated at the convergence of the Thames and Kennet Rivers and halfway between London and Swindon off the M4 Motorway, the population of the entire borough was recorded at 232,662 in a recent census. The ethnic diversities of the population in Reading were recorded as follows: 86.8% White, 5.2% South Asian, 4.1% Afro-Caribbean and 0.7% Chinese.

Reading also acts as a key junction point on the national rail system, being the second largest transfer point (after Clapham Junction in South London) in the UK. The main route in Reading is the Great Western Main Line, which originates in London’s Paddington station and subsequently splitting in Reading, with lines that lead to the West Country and South Wales. Other secondary lines running from Reading include connections with London’s Waterloo station, Gatwick Airport, Birmingham, and the South Coast. 

The major shopping centres in Reading are situated around Broad Street, which include department stores John Lewis-Reading, Debenhams, and House of Fraser (along with branches of Marks & Spencer’s and British Home Stores). Besides two shopping malls, there are also three smaller arcades with specialist stores, as well as a Waterstone’s book-sellers store that was converted from a nonconformist chapel dating back to 1707.

Reading has a number of centres for the arts, such as concert halls and fine art galleries, due to its vibrant cultural arts scene within the borough. Annually, the borough holds two major music festivals – the Reading Festival and WOMAD, respectively – which are perhaps somewhat responsible for Reading’s fame as a highly artistic community. A free culture project called Remix Reading also originated within the borough, which focuses upon copyright and the local arts scene of the area.

The Museum of Reading dates back to 1883, containing galleries that relate to the history of the borough and its industries. The University of Reading also houses the Museum of English Rural Life, the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, the Cole Museum of Zoology, and the Harris Garden.

In regard to sport, the Reading Football Club (nicknamed The Royals) has been playing in the town since 1871, and recently moved to the 24,500-seat Madejski Stadium in 1998. For the 2006-07 season, Reading Football Club are participating in the Premier League season after winning the previous season with a shattering 106 points and 99 goals scored.

In terms of media, the borough has an evening newspaper, The Reading Evening Post, which is published Monday through Friday. There are also three local radio stations – Reading 107 FM, 2-Ten FM and BBC Radio Berkshire – and London’s 95.8 Capital FM can also be received within the Reading area.

Known as a popular holiday tourist spot for Londoners and UK visitors, Brighton and Hove is located on the south coast of England and is most famous for its immense seaside resorts. With an abundance of tourist resorts, hotels, restaurants and various entertainment resources, and additionally the city is home to a considerable industry of business conferences as well as two universities.

One of the main tourist attractions is the pebble beach that has various bars, restaurants, night clubs and arcades along its highly accessible beaches. Brighton is often referred to as “London-by-the-Sea”, also due to its thriving nightlife.

Brighton Pier, also known as the Palace Pier, opened to the public in 1899 and is the largest pier in the city, featuring a funfair and further restaurants and arcades. The West Pier of Brighton was built in 1866 but burned down in 2003. A new plan to erect another landmark in place of the pier is the i360, an observation tower that is being designed by London Eye architects Marks Barfield. 

The city of Brighton recorded 155,919 residents in the 2001 census. While the data for percentages of ethnic groups is not clear, Brighton and its neighbouring city of Hove have a variety of organisations that support the diverse faiths and ethnic minorities of residents in the two cities. The registered charity group MOSAIC, a black and mixed-parentage family group, was formed in Brighton.

It is also noted that Brighton is the least religious town or city in England, with four out of ten people describing themselves as having no religion.

Besides a diverse population of ethnicities, Brighton also has an extensive gay and lesbian community with various “scene” shops, bars and nightclubs, as well as support groups. The city holds a Gay Pride carnival every August, attracting thousands of participants and tourists. Brighton has often been referred to as “the gay capital of Britain”.

In terms of commerce, Brighton is mostly associated with various media business, particularly those in digital and new media companies, and has therefore been nicknamed “Silicon Beach”. The new media community of Brighton is supported by numerous enterprises, including the non-profit business development agency Wired Sussex. The company provides business for over 1,200 digital media companies all over the South East of England. Additionally, American Express has a distinctive former headquarters building on Edward Street. 

One of Brighton’s predominant retail, leisure, and residential area is called The Lanes, with a seafront situated at the southern edge of the neighbourhood. The Lanes are characterised by a collection of narrow alleyways that imitate the original roads of the fishing-based settlement. Local amenities are mostly jewellers, antique shops, restaurants and pubs. The Churchill Square shopping centre is an indoor mall with 85 shops, 5 restaurants and 1,600 car park spaces.

The North Laine area is another retail-leisure-residential region with businesses such as cafés, avant-garde shops, and theatres.

A number of railway services operate from Brighton Station to destinations across the UK, including London’s Victoria station, Portsmouth, and Bedford. There are also services travelling to Birmingham, Manchester, and via Bristol to Wales. The fastest service from the Victoria station takes about 50 minutes.

The Brighton & Hove Bus and Coach Company operates a local bus service around the city, with approximately 300 buses, in addition to a limited night-bus service.


SOUTH EAST ENGLAND: ETHNIC PROFILE

Out of every 1,000 people (on average):
 913 are White British
 38 are White non-British 
23 are Asian
 11 are Mixed Race  
7 are of Black 
 4 are Chinese
Source: Office for National Statistics

The south east region is the third most ethnically diverse region in England. About 9% of the residents are part of ethnic minority groups, although this figure is nominal compared to London (at 40%) and the West Midlands (at 14%). Being the most densely populated region (besides London) with over eight million residents, about 7.3% of those living in the south east were born in a foreign country. 

The towns and cities of the region that are the closest to London in terms of geography (such as Reading and Slough) have a tendency to have more ethnic minority groups in residence, while towns closer to the coastline have less ethnic minorities. In terms of Slough’s smaller population of White British residents (58%), its figure is much higher when compared to the percentages of White British residents living in Dover (96%) and Portsmouth (92%). 

Today, many ethnic minority groups tend to move into this region and further away from the London area after becoming more affluent. However, certain areas are not affected very much by this trend, including the south coast of the region. Still, the city of Southampton has particularly notable ethnic minority communities, mainly south Asians as well as a large Chinese population.

Guildford and Godalming, the towns that are a part of the “Stockbroker Belt” outside of London, have large numbers of those in the White Other groups which suggests there are large amounts of affluent migrants from Europe, Australia, South Africa and North America residing there. Reading, on the other hand, has larger proportions of nearly every ethnic group, including Other White migrants from the United States, France and Germany that make up 4.2% of the city population. There are also large black and Asian populations, which were recorded at 4.1% and 5.2%, respectively. Most of the members of Reading’s black community are of Caribbean descent, and also have the largest concentration of migrants from Sierra Leone (about 220 people) outside of London.

The only other town in the south east region that has a smaller population of white residents (other than Reading) is Slough. About one in five of the 120,000 residents are from an ethnic group other than White British, and (besides London) Slough is considered to be the most diverse place in all of England. If one were to pick any two people at random from the population, there is a 62% chance that each would be from a different ethnic group. 


 POPULATION BY ETHNIC GROUPS
Total South East Population: 8,000,645 

 Local Area/ UK National Average  
Ethnic group/sub-groupPopulationProportion compared to national average
White 7,608,98995.1%
90.9%
 British7,304,67891.3%
86.9%
 Irish82,4051.02%
1.27%
 Other221,9062.77%
2.66%
Mixed 85,7791.07%
1.30%
 White and Black Caribbean23,7420.29%
0.47%
 White and Black African9,4930.11%
0.15%
 White and Asian29,9770.37%
0.37%
 Other mixed22,5670.28%
0.30%
Asian 186,6152.33%
4.57%
 Indian89,2191.11%
2.09%
 Pakistani58,5200.73%
1.43%
 Bangladeshi15,3580.19%
0.56%
 Other Asian23,5180.29%
0.48%
Black 56,9140.71%
2.30%
 Caribbean27,4520.34%
1.14%
 African24,5820.30%
0.96%
 Other Black4,8800.06%
0.19%
Chinese 33,0890.41%
0.44%
    
Other ethnic group 29,2590.36%
0.43%

Source: Census 2001, Office for National Statistics

 

 

SouthEast ENGLAND: SOUTHEAST

The most populous of the nine official regions of England, the boundaries of South East England include the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire, the Isle of Wight, Kent, Oxfordshire, and Surrey.

The population as of 2001 was recorded at 8,000,550 residents, which has the highest amount of residents in England outside of London.

The official usage of the term “South East” to describe this region refers to a varying area; it sometimes applies only to Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex and Surrey, but more often than not it can also mean the Standard Statistical region that includes the London commuter belt of the South East and East Anglia. 

One of the more prosperous towns of the South East is Reading in Berkshire County. Reading is not yet an officially recognised city (as of 2006), although it is an important commercial centre in Southern England that is often called the “Capital of the Thames Valley”. Reading is also home to headquarters for many important British corporations and UK offices for various foreign multinationals, including Microsoft, Oracle, Sage, Xansa and Yell.com.

Situated at the convergence of the Thames and Kennet Rivers and halfway between London and Swindon off the M4 Motorway, the population of the entire borough was recorded at 232,662 in a recent census. The ethnic diversities of the population in Reading were recorded as follows: 86.8% White, 5.2% South Asian, 4.1% Afro-Caribbean and 0.7% Chinese.

Reading also acts as a key junction point on the national rail system, being the second largest transfer point (after Clapham Junction in South London) in the UK. The main route in Reading is the Great Western Main Line, which originates in London’s Paddington station and subsequently splitting in Reading, with lines that lead to the West Country and South Wales. Other secondary lines running from Reading include connections with London’s Waterloo station, Gatwick Airport, Birmingham, and the South Coast. 

The major shopping centres in Reading are situated around Broad Street, which include department stores John Lewis-Reading, Debenhams, and House of Fraser (along with branches of Marks & Spencer’s and British Home Stores). Besides two shopping malls, there are also three smaller arcades with specialist stores, as well as a Waterstone’s book-sellers store that was converted from a nonconformist chapel dating back to 1707.

Reading has a number of centres for the arts, such as concert halls and fine art galleries, due to its vibrant cultural arts scene within the borough. Annually, the borough holds two major music festivals – the Reading Festival and WOMAD, respectively – which are perhaps somewhat responsible for Reading’s fame as a highly artistic community. A free culture project called Remix Reading also originated within the borough, which focuses upon copyright and the local arts scene of the area.

The Museum of Reading dates back to 1883, containing galleries that relate to the history of the borough and its industries. The University of Reading also houses the Museum of English Rural Life, the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, the Cole Museum of Zoology, and the Harris Garden.

In regard to sport, the Reading Football Club (nicknamed The Royals) has been playing in the town since 1871, and recently moved to the 24,500-seat Madejski Stadium in 1998. For the 2006-07 season, Reading Football Club are participating in the Premier League season after winning the previous season with a shattering 106 points and 99 goals scored.

In terms of media, the borough has an evening newspaper, The Reading Evening Post, which is published Monday through Friday. There are also three local radio stations – Reading 107 FM, 2-Ten FM and BBC Radio Berkshire – and London’s 95.8 Capital FM can also be received within the Reading area.

Known as a popular holiday tourist spot for Londoners and UK visitors, Brighton and Hove is located on the south coast of England and is most famous for its immense seaside resorts. With an abundance of tourist resorts, hotels, restaurants and various entertainment resources, and additionally the city is home to a considerable industry of business conferences as well as two universities.

One of the main tourist attractions is the pebble beach that has various bars, restaurants, night clubs and arcades along its highly accessible beaches. Brighton is often referred to as “London-by-the-Sea”, also due to its thriving nightlife.

Brighton Pier, also known as the Palace Pier, opened to the public in 1899 and is the largest pier in the city, featuring a funfair and further restaurants and arcades. The West Pier of Brighton was built in 1866 but burned down in 2003. A new plan to erect another landmark in place of the pier is the i360, an observation tower that is being designed by London Eye architects Marks Barfield. 

The city of Brighton recorded 155,919 residents in the 2001 census. While the data for percentages of ethnic groups is not clear, Brighton and its neighbouring city of Hove have a variety of organisations that support the diverse faiths and ethnic minorities of residents in the two cities. The registered charity group MOSAIC, a black and mixed-parentage family group, was formed in Brighton.

It is also noted that Brighton is the least religious town or city in England, with four out of ten people describing themselves as having no religion.

Besides a diverse population of ethnicities, Brighton also has an extensive gay and lesbian community with various “scene” shops, bars and nightclubs, as well as support groups. The city holds a Gay Pride carnival every August, attracting thousands of participants and tourists. Brighton has often been referred to as “the gay capital of Britain”.

In terms of commerce, Brighton is mostly associated with various media business, particularly those in digital and new media companies, and has therefore been nicknamed “Silicon Beach”. The new media community of Brighton is supported by numerous enterprises, including the non-profit business development agency Wired Sussex. The company provides business for over 1,200 digital media companies all over the South East of England. Additionally, American Express has a distinctive former headquarters building on Edward Street. 

One of Brighton’s predominant retail, leisure, and residential area is called The Lanes, with a seafront situated at the southern edge of the neighbourhood. The Lanes are characterised by a collection of narrow alleyways that imitate the original roads of the fishing-based settlement. Local amenities are mostly jewellers, antique shops, restaurants and pubs. The Churchill Square shopping centre is an indoor mall with 85 shops, 5 restaurants and 1,600 car park spaces.

The North Laine area is another retail-leisure-residential region with businesses such as cafés, avant-garde shops, and theatres.

A number of railway services operate from Brighton Station to destinations across the UK, including London’s Victoria station, Portsmouth, and Bedford. There are also services travelling to Birmingham, Manchester, and via Bristol to Wales. The fastest service from the Victoria station takes about 50 minutes.

The Brighton & Hove Bus and Coach Company operates a local bus service around the city, with approximately 300 buses, in addition to a limited night-bus service.


SOUTH EAST ENGLAND: ETHNIC PROFILE

Out of every 1,000 people (on average):
 913 are White British
 38 are White non-British 
23 are Asian
 11 are Mixed Race  
7 are of Black 
 4 are Chinese
Source: Office for National Statistics

The south east region is the third most ethnically diverse region in England. About 9% of the residents are part of ethnic minority groups, although this figure is nominal compared to London (at 40%) and the West Midlands (at 14%). Being the most densely populated region (besides London) with over eight million residents, about 7.3% of those living in the south east were born in a foreign country. 

The towns and cities of the region that are the closest to London in terms of geography (such as Reading and Slough) have a tendency to have more ethnic minority groups in residence, while towns closer to the coastline have less ethnic minorities. In terms of Slough’s smaller population of White British residents (58%), its figure is much higher when compared to the percentages of White British residents living in Dover (96%) and Portsmouth (92%). 

Today, many ethnic minority groups tend to move into this region and further away from the London area after becoming more affluent. However, certain areas are not affected very much by this trend, including the south coast of the region. Still, the city of Southampton has particularly notable ethnic minority communities, mainly south Asians as well as a large Chinese population.

Guildford and Godalming, the towns that are a part of the “Stockbroker Belt” outside of London, have large numbers of those in the White Other groups which suggests there are large amounts of affluent migrants from Europe, Australia, South Africa and North America residing there. Reading, on the other hand, has larger proportions of nearly every ethnic group, including Other White migrants from the United States, France and Germany that make up 4.2% of the city population. There are also large black and Asian populations, which were recorded at 4.1% and 5.2%, respectively. Most of the members of Reading’s black community are of Caribbean descent, and also have the largest concentration of migrants from Sierra Leone (about 220 people) outside of London.

The only other town in the south east region that has a smaller population of white residents (other than Reading) is Slough. About one in five of the 120,000 residents are from an ethnic group other than White British, and (besides London) Slough is considered to be the most diverse place in all of England. If one were to pick any two people at random from the population, there is a 62% chance that each would be from a different ethnic group. 


 POPULATION BY ETHNIC GROUPS
Total South East Population: 8,000,645 

 Local Area/ UK National Average  
Ethnic group/sub-groupPopulationProportion compared to national average
White 7,608,98995.1%
90.9%
 British7,304,67891.3%
86.9%
 Irish82,4051.02%
1.27%
 Other221,9062.77%
2.66%
Mixed 85,7791.07%
1.30%
 White and Black Caribbean23,7420.29%
0.47%
 White and Black African9,4930.11%
0.15%
 White and Asian29,9770.37%
0.37%
 Other mixed22,5670.28%
0.30%
Asian 186,6152.33%
4.57%
 Indian89,2191.11%
2.09%
 Pakistani58,5200.73%
1.43%
 Bangladeshi15,3580.19%
0.56%
 Other Asian23,5180.29%
0.48%
Black 56,9140.71%
2.30%
 Caribbean27,4520.34%
1.14%
 African24,5820.30%
0.96%
 Other Black4,8800.06%
0.19%
Chinese 33,0890.41%
0.44%
    
Other ethnic group 29,2590.36%
0.43%

Source: Census 2001, Office for National Statistics

 
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